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31

July

Per Stirling Capital Outlook – July 2017

According to Greek Mythology, the road to Thebes was once blocked by a monster called the Sphinx that would not allow travelers to pass unless they could first answer the following riddle: “What animal walks in the morning on four feet, in the afternoon on two feet, and in the evening on three feet?”  Oedipus […]

25

April

Per Stirling Capital Outlook – April 2016

01 Per Stirling Capital Outlook April 2016

Expectations and sentiment are incredibly important in regard to their influence on both the economy and the markets. In regard to markets, too much bullishness is bad, because it means that most of the potential buyers of securities have already bought, and that there is very little sideline cash remaining to drive the markets higher. […]

31

July

Per Stirling Capital Outlook – July 2015

1 - Per Stirling Capital Outlook July 2015

It has been said that, while you cannot predict what the markets are going to do, you oftentimes can predict what investors are going to do and, from our perspective, that is just the other side of the same coin.  Indeed, this premise of investor predictability has developed into alternative investment approaches that can provide […]

26

June

Per Stirling Capital Outlook – June 2015

1 - Per Stirling Capital Outlook June 2015

In 1841, Scottish journalist Charles Mackay first published his so-called “history of popular folly” titled Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds.  Among other things, it examined many of history’s most speculative asset bubbles, including the South Sea Company bubble of 1711–1720, the Mississippi Company bubble of 1719–1720, and the Dutch “tulip mania” of […]

29

May

Per Stirling Capital Outlook – May 2015

Per Stirling Capital Outlook - May 2015 #55 - 1

  When the Federal Reserve first launched its quantitative easing program back in November of 2008, they clearly understood the limitations of such programs.  Chairman Bernanke himself publicly acknowledged that they probably would not have a direct impact on the real economy, and that the Fed would need to instead rely upon the secondary and […]


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